Search published articles


Showing 2 results for Najaf Zadeh Varzi

Annahita Rezaie, Meysam Roozbeh, Saad Goorani Nejad, Hossein Najaf Zadeh Varzi, Seyed Reza Fatemi Tabatabaei, Mahdi Pourmahdi-Broojeni,
Volume 17, Issue 2 (Summer 2013)
Abstract

Introduction: Cyclophosphamide (CYP) is an alkylating agent, which is used in different diseases. It has several important side effects on ovaries. Tribulus terrestris extract (TTE) has different steroidal saponins and has been used for a long time as an aphrodisiac. The aim of this study was to evaluate the protective effects of TTE on the toxicity of CYP in the ovary of rats. Methods: Forty-eight female rats were divided into 6 groups. First group received only normal saline. Group 2, 3 and 5 received CYP (30 mg/kg, 2 times/week for 7 weeks). Groups 3 and 4 received TTE (10 mg/kg, 2 times/week for 10 weeks) and groups 5 and 6 received vitamin C (80 mg/kg, 2 times/week for 7 weeks). At the end of study, blood was collected and the rats were sacrificed. Ovaries were dissected for the histopathological study. Serum levels of estrogen were measured. Results: Histopathological examination revealed significant decrease in the number of follicles in group 2. Estrogen was significantly decreased by CYP in comparison with other groups. Number of follicles in group 3 and 5 were increased. Estrogen levels were also increased. Conclusion: These findings indicated that TTE similar to Vitamin C may improve the side effects of CYP toxicity in the ovary of rats.
Marzieh Khorshidi, Mahnaz Kesmati, Lotfollah Khajeh Pour, Hossein Najaf Zadeh Varzi,
Volume 17, Issue 2 (Summer 2013)
Abstract

Introduction: With the increasing development of nanotechnology, nanomaterials are used instead of conventional compounds. One of these nanomaterials that have many applications in the biomedical field, is iron oxide (Fe2O3) nanoparticles and there is not much research on its effects on the physiological features. So in this research, effect of iron oxide nanoparticles on short and long-term passive avoidance memory and levels of serotonin and dopamine in hippocampus was evaluated in comparison to the bulk type. Methods: In this study, 80 male adult Wistar rats (220±30grams) were used and divided into 10 groups, and the study was performed in two parts in order to measure the behavioral changes and neurotransmitters levels. In the first part, animals received intraperitoneal injections of iron oxide nanoparticles and bulk at different doses (0.2, 1, 5 mg/kg( before training. Then, 90 minutes and 24 hours after training their memory was tested by a step–through instrument. In the second part of the study, right and left hippocampi of every group were extracted after receiving the effective dose (5 mg/kg) of iron oxide nanoparticles and bulk, and neurotransmitters levels were measured by an ELISA kit. Results: Iron oxide nanoparticles caused a disruption in passive avoidance memory in a dose-dependent manner, while bulk iron oxide showed a non significant partial effect. Also both type of iron oxide reduced dopamine levels and increased serotonin levels significantly or relatively in both hippocampi. Conclusion: It seems that iron oxide nanoparticles induce a disruption of memory, which is in part related to the alterations of neurotransmitters levels in hypocampus and the other is associated to its physicochemical properties.

Page 1 from 1