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Showing 3 results for Nahs

Seyyed Ali Mard, Maryam Maleki, Mohammad Kazem Gharib Naseri, Alihosein Saberi,
Volume 15, Issue 4 (1-2012)
Abstract

Introduction: Recently, hydrogen sulfide has been introduced as the third gas that acts as a transmitter. It has many physiological and pharmacological roles in the human body. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of exogenously administered and endogenously produced H2S on the basal and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in rats. Methods: Forty-nine male Wistar rats (150-200 g) were randomly assigned into 7 groups (7 rats per group). To evaluate the effect of H2S on the basal acid secretion, three groups of animals received an IV bolus of NaHS, a H2S donor, at the doses of 20, 40 or 80 μg/Kg. The effects of IV NaHS 20, 40 or 80 μg/Kg were also investigated on distention-induced gastric acid secretion in other three groups. In order to evaluate the effect of endogenously produced H2S on distention-induced gastric acid secretion, one group of animals received IV propargylglycine (PAG), a cystathionine-γ-lyase inhibitor, 100 mg/kg. Results: NaHS decreased the basal and distention-induced gastric acid secretion in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.01). PAG increased the gastric output in response to distention compared to the control group (P<0.001). Conclusion: Our results showed that both exogenous administration and endogenous production of H2S decrease the gastric acid output. Also, the findings of the present study suggest that endogenously produced H2S has a modulatory effect on stimulated gastric acid output similar to nitric oxide (NO).
Seyyed Ali Mard, Iraj Ahmadi, Mohammad Kazem Gharib-Naseri, Feryal Savary,
Volume 21, Issue 3 (9-2017)
Abstract

Introduction: Sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) has shown to enhance the gastric emptying rate in normal rats but till now its effect on gastric emptying of food stuffs in diabetic rats was not investigated. Therefore, this study designed to determine the role of an oral administration of NaHS on gastric emptying rate (GER) of glucose, albumin and olive oil in gastroparetic and normal rats. Methods: To evaluate the effect of NaHS on the gastric emptying of glucose, albumin and olive oil in normal rats, thirty-six normal rats randomly assigned in six experimental groups (6 per group). Three groups of rats considered as control. They received albumin, glucose or olive oil orally. Three other normal groups considered as NaHS-treated animals. These groups received NaHS (320 μg/kg, orally) 30 min prior to food stuffs. To investigate the effect of NaHS on the gastric emptying of food stuffs in diabetic rats, the same protocols carried out. Thirty min after intragastric administration of food stuffs, animals received acetaminophen (as a marker for gastric emptying rate). Results: The results showed that in normal and gastroparetic rats, an oral administration of NaHS accelerated gastric emptying of glucose, albumin and olive oil. The increased gastric emptying of glucose, albumin and olive oil in NaHS-pretreated gastroparetic rats was 89.9, 92.3 and 60% respectively more than in corresponding’s controls.


Nasim Nazariani, Seyyed Ali Mard, Sima Nasri, Ali Veisi,
Volume 22, Issue 1 (3-2018)
Abstract

Introduction: The incidence rate of gastric erosions and ulcers in diabetic patients are higher due to failure of mucosal antioxidant defense and maintain enough blood flow. The present study evaluated the gastro-protective effect of sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS) against indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in diabetic rats. Methods: In order to test anti-ulcer activity of NaHS against indomethacin, four diabetic groups of rats including diabetic control and 3 NaHS-treated groups received a single dose of physiologic saline or NaHS at 320, 640 and 1280 μg/kg respectively, 30 min before ulcer induction by indomethacin. Five hours later, the animals were killed and their stomachs were removed for macroscopically and microscopically evaluations. In order to evaluate the antacid effect of NaHS, 4 groups of diabetic rats received physiologic saline or NaHS at 320, 640 and 1280 μg/kg and 30 min later anesthetized, underwent a midline laparotomy and then their pylorus ligated. Five hours later, the animals were killed, their stomachs were removed and pH of gastric effluents were measured. Results: Indomethacin induced gastric lesions in glandular part of the stomach. NaHS at 640 and 1280 μg/kg significantly decreased the indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in diabetic rats. The pH of gastric effluents and mucus content increased by NaHS at doses of 640 and 1280 μg/kg. Macroscopic and microscopic observations showed that mucosal erosions induced by indomethacin were significantly inhibited by NaHS. Conclusion: results suggest NaHS through decreasing the rate of gastric acid output and increasing the mucus production, protected the gastric mucosa against indomethacin-induced gastric lesions in diabetic rats.



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