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Showing 5 results for Pourabdolhossein

Ameneh Shahroukhi, Asghar Qassemi, Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein, Ali Khoshbaten, Alireza Asgari,
Volume 10, Issue 3 (Fall 2006)
Abstract

Introduction: Compounds which are used to treat organophosphate (OP) poisoning are not able to fully alleviate long lasting effects. They are mainly used to antagonize cholinergic effects of Ops. However, non-cholinergic effects, such as interference with different neurotransmitter systems, especially GABA release and uptake, are recently attracting more attentions. We have tried to investigate any potential interaction between paraoxon and GABA uptake. Methods: We used cerebellar synaptosomes. Cerebellum of 250-280 g Wistar rats were rapidly dissected out, homogenized, centrifuged, and incubated with 0.01 μ M [3H]GABA in the presence of different doses of paraoxon for 10 minutes at 37 oC. At the end of the incubation period, synaptosomes were layered in chambers of superfusion system. In order to assay the amounts of [3H]GABA taken up, radioactivity was measured using a β-counter. Results: Our findings reveal that mean GABA uptake was 111.42, 95.37, 71.6, 73.53 and 75 percent of the control values in the presence of different concentrations of paraoxon (0.01, 0.1, 1, 10 and 100μ M) respectively. GABA uptake was significantly reduced at doses 1, 10 and 100μ M (p<0.05). Conclusion: It seems that paraoxon at higher doses may interfere with GABA uptake by cerebellar synaptosomes.
Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein, Sabah Mozafari, Mohammad Javan, Sied Javad Mirnajafizadeh, Abolhassan Ahmadiani,
Volume 14, Issue 4 (Winter 2011)
Abstract

Introduction: Demyelination is one of the main causes of neurological disability. It is the end product of numerous pathological processes, multiple sclerosis (MS) being the most common cause. More than 70% of the MS patients suffer from optic disturbances. This disease commonly affects the optic pathway, particularly the optic nerves and chiasm. Several attempts have been made to produce a suitable model of demyelination in optic apparatus up to now. Methods: Local demyelination model was generated using direct injection of lysolecithin (LPC) into the optic chiasm of C57/BLJ6 mice without any undesirable distributions of gliotoxin into other brain structures. Histological and electrophysiological assessments of the processes of demyelination and remyelination in the animal model were done with specific myelin staining and visual evoked potential (VEP) recordings. Results: In this study, both electrophysiological and histological results demonstrated that maximum level of demyelination was observed on day 7 post lesion and an incomplete yet significant remyelination took place on day 14 post lesion. Conclusion: Results showed a relatively rapid endogenous myelin repair in mice optic chiasm. Furthermore, this report might offer a new tool to address possible involvement of new origins of myelin-forming cells and subsequently their manipulation to promote myelin repair in the adult central nervous system.
Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein, Samaneh Dehghan, Barbara Demeneix, Mohammad Javan,
Volume 21, Issue 3 (September 2017)
Abstract

Introduction: Nogo-A and Nogo receptor (NgR) are expressed in the subventricular zone (SVZ) stem cells. NgR plays critical inhibitory roles in axonal regeneration and remyelination. However, the role of NgR in SVZ niche behaviors in demyelination context is still uncertain. Here we investigated the effects of NgR inhibition on SVZ niche reaction in a local model of demyelination in adult mouse optic chiasm. Methods: Demyelination was induced in adult mouse optic chiasm by microinjection of lysolecithin. We injected siRNAs against NgR intracerebroventricularly via a permanent cannula over 14 days to knockdown NgR. To trace SVZ stem cells and assess the effect of NgR inhibition on their reaction, BrdU was injected to the animals prior to the demyelination induction. Immunohistochemistry and histological analysis was carried out 3, 7 and 14 days post demyelination lesion. Results: NgR inhibition significantly increased the numbers of proliferating cells in SVZ in response to demeylination. The number of BrdU+/Olig2+progenitor cells in the neurogenic zone of the lateral ventricles was enhanced when NgR was blocked. These progenitor cells (Olig2+, GFAP+ or PSA-NCAM) were mobilized away from this SVZ as a function of time. Inhibition of NgR significantly reduced demyelination extension in optic chiasm. Conclusion: Our findings reveal that inhibition of NgR potentiates adult SVZ progenitor cells proliferation and differentiation in demyelination condition and facilitates remyelination in the optic chiasm. Therefore, inhibition of NgR function could have therapeutic potential for demyelinating disease like multiple sclerosis.


Reza Naeimi, Maryam Ghasemi-Kasman, Sohrab Kazemi, Manouchehr Ashrafpour, Ali Akbar Moghadamnia, Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein,
Volume 22, Issue 2 (June 2018)
Abstract

Introduction: Recently, herbal medicine is widely used as an alternative and complementary therapy in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of Zingiber officinale or ginger have been well-documented. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginger extract pre-treatment on seizures behavior, neuronal density and astrocytes activation in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)- induced kindling model. Methods: Kindling model was induced in mice by repetitive administration of PTZ at sub convulsive dose. Hydroalcoholic extract of ginger at doses of 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg were daily injected 10 days before PTZ injections and intraperitoneal administration of extract was continued 1h before each PTZ injection. Immunostaining against NeuN and GFAP as neuronal and astrocyte markers, respectively, was carried out on brain tissue sections. Results: Our data showed that ginger extract pre-treatment, especially at dose of 100 mg/kg, reduced the seizures behavior in PTZ receiving animals. Immunostaining against NeuN biomarker demonstrated that neuronal death was alleviated in animals under treatment of ginger extract. Furthermore, application of ginger extract attenuated the number of GFAP expressing cells in hippocampus of fully-kindled animals. Conclusion: Overall, our data suggest that ginger pre-treatment exerts significant neuroprotective effect by attenuation of astrocytes activation in PTZ-induced kindling model. It can be concluded that ginger might be used as effective supplementary agent in epileptic patients.


Sahand Asharfpour, Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein, Forough Ebrahim Tabar, Manouchehr Ashrafpour, Mojdeh Navidhamidi, Sima Shahabi, Maryam Ghasemi-Kasman, Alireza Asgari,
Volume 22, Issue 2 (June 2018)
Abstract

Introduction: Synaptosomes are sealed particles that contain mitochondria, cytoskeleton and vesicles which are necessary to synaptic events like neurotransmitter release and uptake in the nervous system. However, the effect of high and low temperatures on synaptosome membrane integrity and function during a time course after its extraction is less known. The purpose of this study was to assess synaptosome viability and function at 37, 4°C and room temperature (RT) during 6 hours after its extraction. Methods: Hippocampi of 40 male Wistar rats were used for synaptosome preparation. To ensure synaptosome membrane integrity and function, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and GABA uptake were assessed during 6 successive hours after their extraction at 37, 4°C and RT. Results: Our results showed that at 37°C, synaptosome membrane integrity was reduced 3 hours but at 4°C and RT, it occurred 5 hours following their extraction. The results of synaptosome function analysis coincide with LDH enzyme assay data, meaning that GABA uptake faced a 50% reduction from the initial value at 37°C after 3 hours and at RT after 5 hours. We also found that GABA uptake was reduced at 4°C in the first hour after extraction because the low temperature inhibits GABA transporters. Conclusion: Synaptosomes preserved their viability and function at RT, 37 and 4°C at least for 3 hours after extraction and reduced over time. For long term application of synaptosomes, it is better to keep them at 4°C.



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