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Showing 2 results for Ghasemi-Kasman

Reza Naeimi, Maryam Ghasemi-Kasman, Sohrab Kazemi, Manouchehr Ashrafpour, Ali Akbar Moghadamnia, Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein,
Volume 22, Issue 2 (June 2018)
Abstract

Introduction: Recently, herbal medicine is widely used as an alternative and complementary therapy in several neurological disorders such as epilepsy. The anti-inflammatory and neuroprotective effects of Zingiber officinale or ginger have been well-documented. The present study was designed to evaluate the effects of ginger extract pre-treatment on seizures behavior, neuronal density and astrocytes activation in pentylenetetrazol (PTZ)- induced kindling model. Methods: Kindling model was induced in mice by repetitive administration of PTZ at sub convulsive dose. Hydroalcoholic extract of ginger at doses of 25, 50 or 100 mg/kg were daily injected 10 days before PTZ injections and intraperitoneal administration of extract was continued 1h before each PTZ injection. Immunostaining against NeuN and GFAP as neuronal and astrocyte markers, respectively, was carried out on brain tissue sections. Results: Our data showed that ginger extract pre-treatment, especially at dose of 100 mg/kg, reduced the seizures behavior in PTZ receiving animals. Immunostaining against NeuN biomarker demonstrated that neuronal death was alleviated in animals under treatment of ginger extract. Furthermore, application of ginger extract attenuated the number of GFAP expressing cells in hippocampus of fully-kindled animals. Conclusion: Overall, our data suggest that ginger pre-treatment exerts significant neuroprotective effect by attenuation of astrocytes activation in PTZ-induced kindling model. It can be concluded that ginger might be used as effective supplementary agent in epileptic patients.


Sahand Asharfpour, Fereshteh Pourabdolhossein, Forough Ebrahim Tabar, Manouchehr Ashrafpour, Mojdeh Navidhamidi, Sima Shahabi, Maryam Ghasemi-Kasman, Alireza Asgari,
Volume 22, Issue 2 (June 2018)
Abstract

Introduction: Synaptosomes are sealed particles that contain mitochondria, cytoskeleton and vesicles which are necessary to synaptic events like neurotransmitter release and uptake in the nervous system. However, the effect of high and low temperatures on synaptosome membrane integrity and function during a time course after its extraction is less known. The purpose of this study was to assess synaptosome viability and function at 37, 4°C and room temperature (RT) during 6 hours after its extraction. Methods: Hippocampi of 40 male Wistar rats were used for synaptosome preparation. To ensure synaptosome membrane integrity and function, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH) and GABA uptake were assessed during 6 successive hours after their extraction at 37, 4°C and RT. Results: Our results showed that at 37°C, synaptosome membrane integrity was reduced 3 hours but at 4°C and RT, it occurred 5 hours following their extraction. The results of synaptosome function analysis coincide with LDH enzyme assay data, meaning that GABA uptake faced a 50% reduction from the initial value at 37°C after 3 hours and at RT after 5 hours. We also found that GABA uptake was reduced at 4°C in the first hour after extraction because the low temperature inhibits GABA transporters. Conclusion: Synaptosomes preserved their viability and function at RT, 37 and 4°C at least for 3 hours after extraction and reduced over time. For long term application of synaptosomes, it is better to keep them at 4°C.



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